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Beatles For Sale (Remastered)

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Beatles For Sale (Remastered)

The classic original Beatles studio albums have been re-mastered by a dedicated team of engineers at Abbey Road Studios in London over a four year period utilising state of the art recording technology alongside vintage studio equipment, carefully maintaining the authenticity and integrity of the original analogue recordings. The result of this painstaking process is the highest fidelity the Beatles catalogue has seen since its original release.

Within each CD’s new packaging, booklets include detailed historical notes along with informative recording notes. For a limited period, each CD will also be embedded with a brief documentary film about the album. The newly produced mini-documentaries on the making of each album, directed by Bob Smeaton, are included as QuickTime files on each album. The documentaries contain archival footage, rare photographs and never-before-heard studio chat from The Beatles, offering a unique and very personal insight into the studio atmosphere.Banged out in a hurry for the 1964 Christmas market, Beatles for Sale sometimes sounds it, loaded with ill-conceived covers and some of John Lennon’s most self-loathing lyrics. On the other hand, the people doing the banging-out were the Beatles, whose instincts for what worked musically were so strong that they could basically do no wrong–any record that has “Baby’s in Black,” “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party” and the delectable “Eight Days a Week” on it is only “minor” in the most relative sense. And, though their voices had been frazzled a bit by constant touring, they revved them up for some joyous shouting, and indulged their fondness for American country in subtle, playful ways. –Douglas Wolk

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Comments

Daniel J. Hamlow says:

Sombre but still excellent The fourth album by the Fabs is, yes, kind of subdued, but not by much. There are upbeat numbers like “Rock And Roll Music,” the US #1 single “Eight Days A Week,” Ringo’s cover of Carl Perkins’ “Honey Don’t,” and the Little Richard medley to speed things up. Gee, I’ve listed the bright spots of the album already!

Alan Caylow says:

The Best Of Both Beatles Worlds “Beatles For Sale,” the Fab Four’s fourth album, is not regarded as highly as their other works. The Beatles hammered this record out pretty fast as they recorded it between tours, and they were pressed for time in coming up with new stuff. Thus, the album is only half original material, while the other half are cover songs (8 Beatles originals and 6 covers, to be precise). But I’m not bothered by this one single bit. Yes, more original songs would’ve been appreciated, but we must remember that one of the Beatles’ early trademarks was doing excellent cover songs as well as their own stuff, and “Beatles For Sale” gives you a healthy dose of both. The end result is a wonderful Beatles album. Regarding the band’s original compositions, they’re all classics: John Lennon’s “No Reply” and “I’m A Loser,” Paul McCartney’s “I’ll Follow The Sun” (an older song that McCartney dug up from his club days with the group) and “What You’re Doing,” and the duo’s brilliant collaborations on “Baby’s In Black,” “Eight Days A Week,” “Every Little Thing,” and “I Don’t Want To Spoil The Party.” The Beatles ain’t no slouches when covering other people’s songs either, and the batch of covers on “Beatles For Sale” are all tremendous fun. Lennon has a great time at the mike on Chuck Berry’s “Rock And Roll Music,” McCartney tears it up on the medley of “Kansas City” and “Hey Hey Hey,” Ringo Starr gets one of his signature vocal performances on Carl Perkins’ “Honey Don’t,” and George Harrison, also a Carl Perkins fan, does great justice to “Everybody’s Trying To Be My Baby.” “Mr. Moonlight” is another fine cover, as is the group’s rendition of Buddy Holly’s “Words Of Love” (with Ringo playing on a packing case!).The Beatles’ close friend Derek Taylor wrote in the album’s liner notes back in 1964: “The kids of AD 2000 will draw from the music much the same sense of well-being and warmth as we do today.” Needless to say, Taylor was 100% right. “Beatles For Sale” may be underappreciated by some, but it shouldn’t be. By dividing the album into half originals and half covers, the Fab Four give us the best of both of their musical worlds. Whether doing their own stuff OR other people’s, these guys had the magic touch. “Beatles For Sale,” filled with great Beatles music from beginning to end, is great testament to that.


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